Photo Ark es un proyecto único que hace varios años puso en marcha National Geographic junto con el el fotógrafo Joel Sartore; y que pretende retratar aquellas especies que viven en cautiverio, antes de que desaparezcan.

Joel Sartore ha fotografiado a más de 5 mil y su meta es poder llegar hasta las 12 mil especies de animales en peligro de extinción.

Aquí tenéis sólo una pequeña muestra de su trabajo, esperamos que os guste ¡Que la disfrutéis!

 

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An endangered Indian rhinoceros female with calf (Rhinoceros unicornis) at the Fort Worth Zoo. (Image ID: ANI050-00091)

Una hembra de rinoceronte indio en peligro de extinción con su cría (Rhinoceros unicornis) en el Zoológico de Fort Worth

 

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An African wild cat (Felis silvestris lybica) at Omaha Zoo's Wildlife Safari Park. (Image ID: ANI019-00273)

Un gato salvaje africano (Felis silvestris lybica) en el safari del parque zoológico de Omaha

 

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Yellow-streaked lory (Chalcopsitta sintillata) at the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. (Image ID: BIR053-00014)

El lori chispeado (Chalcopsitta sintillata) Metroparks Zoo de Cleveland

 

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Rajah, a male white Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) at Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo. (Image ID: ANI019-00460)

Rajah, un macho de tigre de Bengala (Panthera tigris tigris) en Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo

 

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Oblong-winged katydids (Amblycorypha oblongifolia) at the Insectarium in New Orleans. These color variants are found in nature, though anything but green is usually eaten by predators immediately. The Insectarium has been a leader in breeding these color variants for display in the zoo community. (Image ID: INS012-00009)

Saltamontes de alas oblongo (Amblycorypha oblongifolia)  en el insectario de Nueva Orlenas

 

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A female African elephant (Loxodonta africana) at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo. (Image ID: ANI018-00015)

Hembra de elefante africano (Loxodonta africana) en el zoológico de Cheyenne Mountain

 

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Studio portraits of a half-day-old hatchling leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) from the wild in Bioko. (Image ID: ANI024-00503)

Tortuga laúd (Dermochelys coriacea) en Bioko.

 

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A captive California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) at the Phoenix Zoo. (Image ID: BIR008-00103)

El cóndor de California (Gymnogyps californianus) en el Zoo de Phoenix.

 

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Sumatran orangutan, Pongo abelii, at the Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville, TX. (Image ID: ANI064-00068)

Orangután de Sumatra, Pongo abelii, en el Zoológico Gladys Porter en Brownsville, TX

 

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A green tree python (Morelia viridis) at the Riverside Zoo. (Image ID: ANI027-00107)

Pitón arborícola verde (Morelia viridis) en el zoológico de Riverside.

 

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Gordon's purple mossy frogs (Theloderma gordoni) play dead at Reptile Gardens. (Image ID: ANI068-00170)

Rana musgosa de Gordon (Theloderma gordoni) haciéndose las muertas en Reptile Gardens.

 

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A critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) named "Presley" at the Duke Lemur Center. BEB lemurs are named here after blue-eyed actors and actresses. He has a twin sister named 'Margret', after Ann Margret. Only 61 are found in captivity worldwide, 21 of those in North America. (Image ID: ANI042-00048)

Lemur negro de ojos azules ( flavifrons Eulemur) llamado”Presley” en el Centro de Lemures de Duke. Sólo 61 ejemplares se encuentran en cautividad en todo el mundo.

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